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20121201
20121231
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)
fraud in the referendum for a new constitution. we talk with opposition leader mohamed el-baradei. consider a sad day in my view for it is going to institutionalize -- >> ifill: the legal showdown between california health center that discusses marijuana and >> ifill: we have the story of a legal showdown between a california health center that dispenses marijuana and federal authorities. >> just people feel safe coming here. like going to your neighborhood cvs or anywhere else. >> brown: open season in congress look >> brown: seven weeks after election day, there are open seats in congress. we look at contests in three senate races. >> ifill: fred de sam lazaro profiles a priest who became a doctor to help haiti's poor and orphaned children. >> brown: and we close with a conversation with the editor of a new anthology of verse: 100 poems written over 100 years. >> it doesn't have poetry. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> a
on the constitution has become a referendum on egypt's islamic president, mohamed morsi. >> reporter: both sides of the egyptian political divide plan major marches and rallies this morning. government supporters are calling a yes vote on the referendum a vote for islam. the opposition is fragmented and far less organized and decided only a few days ago to vote no rather than boycott the ballot. the new constitution was drafted by the ruling islamist party and its hard-line political allies. the mainly secular opposition says the 63-page document does not represent all of egypt's 83 million people and tramples on the rights of minorities such as christians. a major problem is a lack of monitors. a significant number of judges have refused to supervisor the 13,000 polling stations so the voting will have to be held over two days first in major cities an then in the countryside. many egyptians are simply growing weary after two years of political turmoil. adding to their woes is the effect on the economy. the tourism industry has been hard-hit and the prospects of attracting f
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)